Summons

The summons form alerts you that you have been assigned to a particular “term” or time period of service.

If you’ve received a summons, it’s important that you fill out and the “information card” at the bottom of the form within five days of receipt—you may do this online using eJuror or detach and mail the bottom part of the form to us in the postage-paid envelope we sent to you for that purpose.

Both potential petit jurors and potential grand jurors receive summons forms from our court. If your “on call” time period is one month, you have been summoned for Petit  jury service.  Click the link for more information about petit jury service and what will be expected of you.

If the time period is six months, you have been summoned as a candidate for Grand Jury service. Click the link for more information about grand jury service and what will be expected of you.

[+] What is this form for?[–] What is this form for?

The summons gives us an opportunity to update your address and contact information. It also gives you a chance to submit requests for a deferral of your jury service to another month, a partial excuse from jury service, or a total excuse for reasons that may not have been addressed by the original questionnaire. If you have travel plans or other commitments during your term of service, or if you feel you can’t serve for any reason, this is a good time to contact the Jury Section. Although you can submit your request by eJuror or by mail, speaking with us first will give us a chance to explain how we can help you and what we need from you.

[+] Why did I get this form?[–] Why did I get this form?

Your name was drawn at random from Louisiana’s voter registration lists and you were previously mailed a juror qualification questionnaire. You completed the questionnaire and, based on your responses, your name was placed into a pool of qualified persons available to serve jury duty in our court.

From that pool of qualified persons, your name was randomly drawn as a potential juror during the time period shown on the summons.

[+] Am I required to complete the form?[–] Am I required to complete the form?

Yes, federal law requires that you complete the form in its entirety and return it to us promptly, either by mail or through eJuror, even if you are requesting to be excused. Please don’t forget to sign and date the form if you are mailing it.

[+] When should I report?[–] When should I report?

If your summons says “on call” and the date is approximately one-month long, you have been summoned for a PETIT jury. A summons for PETIT jury service with our court is not an order to appear yet. You are being informed that you are “on call” (or on standby) to serve during this period. During this month, you may receive one or more “notices to report” for jury duty. These notices will state a specific day and time to appear. If you have vacation plans or other commitments during your month-long term which will temporarily prevent you from serving, now is the time to tell us about them. See PETIT JURY SERVICE for more information.

If your summons has a six-month time period listed, you have been summoned for GRAND JURY service. Please report on the specific date and time indicated on the summons. The selection of the grand jury will take place on the date and time assigned on your summons form. Your service is required on that day, unless you are excused ahead of time by the court. If you know you won’t be available on that day, it is imperative that you inform the court at this time. Vacation plans or other commitments during the rest of your term need not be addressed at this time. See GRAND JURY for more information.

[+] How can I be excused from jury service?[–] How can I be excused from jury service?

[+] How can I request to have my service deferred to a different time period?[–] How can I request to have my service deferred to a different time period?

[+] I have vacation or business travel plans during my term of service—what should I do?[–] I have vacation or business travel plans during my term of service—what should I do?